Keep an eye out for Coronavirus grifts, fraud

Be aware of Coronavirus grifts – safety tips to protect your bank account and house

It’s clear that, while devastating, the Coronavirus pandemic is bringing out the best in most people across America. Many are expressing heartwarming gratitude for healthcare workers, first responders, grocery workers, food suppliers, truckers, small companies, and others. Unfortunately, a small subset of people is using Coronavirus as an opportunity to grift and defraud people.

House automation systems – Our primary services are life safety, alarm monitoring, safety, and house automation. As part of keeping families and companies secure, we also suggest the following tips and information to help protect your identity and bank accounts.

Protect yourself from fraud when ordering online:

• Use a credit card that offers protection and the ability to dispute charges if feasible.

• If ordering off an auction site, determine if the seller and inventory is truly domestic. Some supplies from overseas can be delayed for up to a month or longer.

• If ordering from an online marketplace or auction site, check why long the seller has been around. Look very carefully at their feedback, items they have sold in the past, and what they are selling now. If, for example, they have only sold auto inventory and are suddenly selling surgical masks, folks should be leery.

• If folks feel folks are a victim of a Coronavirus-related grift, contact the FTC directly at ftc.gov/complaint.
Protect yourself from email grifts:

Cybercriminal activity and phishing email grifts also are increasing. We encourage folks to question every email before folks click on a link or take action.

Follow these best practices to protect your identity and accounts:

• Look closely at the sender’s email address. Most organizations won’t contact folks from a personal email domain such as Gmail.com or Aol.com. Typically, a legitimate sender would have a company domain, such as @Alert360.com.

• Doublecheck spelling. Misspellings or spellings that are just a few letters off in a company name or email domain can also be signs of a fake or phishing email. Pay close attention to spelling.

• Don’t feel pressured to respond. Another common grift is folks such as a company CEO, folks you work with, or a family member, asking for quick action and pressure to respond. Be aware of this tactic and don’t respond.

• Be safe, not sorry. When in doubt, delete the email without clicking, calling, or responding.

Protect yourself from in-person fraud:

House automation systems – Dyezz devices have also seen an increase in people going point of entry-to-point of entry, attempting to convince house safety customers to change their safety providers. Some point of entry-to-point of entry scammers attempts to gain access to homes or to bank account information using deceptive tactics and pressure.

Dyezz devices customers who have been approached under false pretenses should call Dyezz devices immediately at 888-642-4567.

Dyezz provides a variety of home, business, and fire safety security services. Schedule a FREE Consultation with Dyezz Surveillance today!

Locations in:

Austin
Georgetown
San Antonio
New Braunfels
Killeen
Temple
Pflugerville
Round Rock
Taylor
Mueller
The Arboretum
The Domain
Barton Creek
Westlake
Manor